Howdy! This page is part of a guide to comic books recommended for younger readers (along with some stuff their parents might like as well. This page covers the letter "O", other books are linked to below.

So, come celebrate that groovy, geeky, magical medium that we all grew up on... and share that special sense of wonder with someone smaller and newer than you. By the way, this is a work in progress, and your recommendations are always welcome... )








Comics For Kids: A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X, Y, Z
Read That Again: New Reviews | Picture Books | Main Index




"Ottoline And The Yellow Cat"
Written and illustrated by Chris Ridell
(Harper Collins, 2007)

Chris Ridell, the illustrator of Paul Stewart's delightful Far-Flung Adventures series, embarks on a similarly-enchanting solo project, a graphic-novel/chapterbook hybrid starring a self-possessed little girl named Ottoline Brown who lives alone in a palatial apartment along with a mysterious, petlike shaggy companion named Mr. Munroe, who helps her solve mysteries and fight crime. The Eloise-meets-Nancy Drew vibe is fun, but it's really Ridell's artwork that's the big wow factor here: he's a master of kooky detail, with visual jokes and nutty asides that wonderfully amplify the humor of the text -- maps, diagrams, floor plans, books-within-books and curious character portraits abound. This first adventure will appeal to young readers, especially precocious little girls -- and if you like the Ottoline books, backtracking to the Far-Flung series is highly recommended. (B+)


"Ottoline Goes To School"
Written and illustrated by Chris Ridell
(Harper Collins, 2009)

In the second volume, Ottoline makes a new friend and, having nothing better to do, decides to go to her friend's weird, wacky private school, an Addams Family-esque institution populated with a small cast of weird, wacky kids, and a mysterious mystery that Ottoline and her pals have to crack. I found the formula to be a little strained this time around, but it's still a good series. Worth checking out if you liked the first book. (B)


"Ottoline At Sea"
Written and illustrated by Chris Ridell
(Harper Collins, 2010)

(-)


"Owly, v.1: The Way Home & The Bittersweet Summer"
Written and illustrated by Andy Runton
(Top Shelf Productions, 2004)

This is one of those places where I part company with a lot of kiddie comic readers... The popular Owly series, while sweet and unthreatening, is a little too weird and too cutesy for me. Mostly wordless, the Owly stories feature a cast of woodland creatures who have innocent adventures, primarily defined by Owly the owl's do-noodnik tendencies -- he rescues small animals and is nice to his friends, etc. Part of my problem is I'm not wild about the artwork, which I find blocky and frequently hard to follow... The series has the DIY feel of all those old self-produced '80s/'90s minicomics and 'zines, which has obvious appeal to families that want to encourage their kids to make their own stories... but as a reader, I personally want something with a little more ooomph. Anyway, if you're looking for sweet, nonviolent comics for little kids to read, Owly is a good option... Lots of folks love it, and it's worth checking out, though maybe not for everybody. (B-)


"Owly, v.2: Just A Little Blue"
Written and illustrated by Andy Runton
(Top Shelf Productions, 2005)

(B-)


"Owly, v.3: Flying Lessons"
Written and illustrated by Andy Runton
(Top Shelf Productions, 2005)

(B-)


"Owly, v.4: A Time To Be Brave"
Written and illustrated by Andy Runton
(Top Shelf Productions, 2007)

(B-)


"Owly, v.5: Tiny Tales"
Written and illustrated by Andy Runton
(Top Shelf Productions, 2008)

(B-)




More Comics For Kids >> Letter "P"



Home Page

Other Book Reviews
Slipcue.Com (Music & Film)




Copyright owned by Read That Again.Com.  All Rights Reserved.  
Unauthorized use, reproduction or translation is prohibited.